Jun 062019
 

This is not going to be a very long review.especially since I’ve got a video up where I talk about this scope. It is embedded a bit further down and there is also a link there for the same video on gunstreamer.com if you prefer that platform to YouTube.

LPVOs (Low Power Variable Optics) are getting increasingly more competent across the board. The original idea behind riflescopes of this type was to provide good performance on 1x, with performance on top magnification *first 4x, then 6x, 7x, 8x, etc) being almost an afterthought. However, recently I am seeing more and more riflescopes that are increasingly well optimized across the entire magnification range with the Blaser being, potentially, the best of the bunch in terms of optomechanical quality.

I do not think Blaser intends to market this for tactical/AR-15 use, especially since their sister brand Minox already has an excellent ZP8 1-8×24. However, they really should consider it. I think they can grab a nice slice of the market by simply adding a couple of reticles with holdover points and, maybe, some sort of an AR compatible mounting solution (although I will freely admit that the Zeiss rail on the bottom of the scope is a very flexible mounting options as is). I used Recknagel rail mounts on top of the 22MOA Badger riser and the optical axis was at just the right height.

The reason I tested the scope on my AR-15 is mostly that I wanted to spend some time shooting offhand on low power which burns a lot of ammo and 25.56×45 is comparatively more affordable.


Blaser 1-7×28Minox
ZP8
1-8×24
Nightforce ATACR
1-8×24
Leica
Magnus
1-6.3×24
GPO
TAC
1-8×24
Swaro
Z8i
1-8×24
Length, in12.511.61010.710.711.9
Weight, oz22.824.521191918.2
Main Tube Diameter34mm34mm34mm30mm34mm30mm
Eye Relief, in3.53.53.743.53.543.74
FOV, ft@1000yards123 – 18
21 @ 6x
112 – 14.4 19.2 @ 6x96 – 13.1
17.5 @ 6x
122 – 19.320.2 @ 6x107 – 13 17.4 @ 6x127.5 – 15.9
21.2 @ 6x
Exit Pupil10 – 410.3 – 311 – 312.4 – 3.811 – 38.1 – 3
Click Value0.1 mrad0.1 mrad0.1 mrad0.1 mrad0.1 mrad0.1 mrad
Adjustment per turn10 mrad10 mrad10 mrad10 mrad10 mrad10 mrad
Adjustment range18mrad10 mrad30 mradE: 20 mradW: 14 mrad29 mrad20 mrad
Zero StopNoYesYesNoNoYes
Reticle LocationFFPFFPFFPSFPFFPSFP
Price$3095$3000$2800$2300$1800$2700

Looking at the spec table above, a few things jump out. One is that the Blaser is expensive. Another is that it easily the widest FOV of the available FFP low power scope. It almost matches the FOV of the second focal plane Swaro Z8i, except it does so with a larger exit pupil and front focal plane reticle. Rather importantly, when you are trying to go fast with the scope on 1x, the exit pupil on low power matters. I experimented with a bunch of different scope and it seem like for optimal performance I need an exit pupil of 10mm or more. If it gets smaller on 1x, that is not a huge deal, but I can feel the difference especially from suboptimal shooting positions.

Also, Blaser is the only 28mm objective in this group and, while I have not seen all of these side by side, I am pretty confident it will do better than any 24mm scope in low light. It is not a huge difference, but it is there.

Here is a brief video review:

Here is a short video shot through the scope using a Skoped Vision adapter. It is not nearly as good of the image as you get looking directly through the scope, but it is a good representation of what the reticle looks like.

Keep in mind that the physical reticle is sized so it does not stand out much on 1x. That is where the large illuminated dot is supposed to really stand out for a shooting experience close to that of a red dot sight.

Below 4.5x, the dot is 1 mrad in diameter (right around 3 MOA). Above 4.5x, it is 0.25 mrad in diameter for precise aiming.

Blaser calls the technology IVD: Intelligent Variable Dot. I really like how it works and I hope it extends to different products and applications.

 Posted by at 10:04 am